Former world leaders visit Caerleon Roman Fortress and Baths as part of the InterAction Council

Monday 15 June 2015

An international organization of a group of former heads of state from around the world took a trip back to the Roman era as they visited Caerleon Roman Fortress, Baths and Amphitheatre recently

  • Picture of the InterAction Council visiting Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

    InterAction Council visiting Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

  • Picture of the InterAction Council visiting Caerleon Roman Fortress and Baths

    InterAction Council visiting Caerleon Roman Fortress and Baths

  • Picture of the InterAction Council walking across Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

    InterAction Council walking across Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

As part of a wider programme of events, visits were undertaken to the Roman baths, amphitheatre and National Roman Legionary Museum in Caerleon on Wednesday 3rd June.  

Three groups of VIPs, including 25 former heads of state, were shown around each site within a cycle of tours conducted by Jon Berry, Senior Inspector of AMs and Archaeology in South Wales  (Caerleon Amphitheatre and Barracks), Verdun Howells (National Roman Legionary Museum) and Louise Mees, Regional Inspector of AMs and Archaeology (Roman Fortress Baths).

Louise Mees, Regional Inspector of AMs and Archaeology said: ““It was a pleasure to welcome this group of distinguished guests to Caerleon.  In addition to expressing an interest in the archaeological remains, and the state’s role in conserving, interpreting and providing access to our heritage, I felt that they really got a flavour of life in South Wales, as experienced by the Roman Legionaries some 2000 years ago”.  

She added “Many of the Roman occupants originated from areas such as Italy, Provence, Spain and the Rhineland.  They introduced elements of comfort and leisure that improved the existence for life abroad in a colder climate than the one that they had experienced in their homelands.  The cathedral like expanse of the Roman baths, excavated in the 20th century and now on display by Cadw, are an example of cutting edge technology employed by the Roman builders to create a sumptuous leisure facility which might be compared with a modern health spa”.

The InterAction Council was established in 1983 as an independent international organization to mobilize the experience, energy and international contacts of a group of statesmen who have held the highest office in their own countries. Council members jointly develop recommendations and practical solutions for the political, economic and social problems confronting humanity.

The Council is unique in bringing together on a regular basis, and in an informal setting, more than thirty former heads of state or government. Serving in their individual capacities, the Council aims at fostering international co-operation and action in three priority areas: Peace and security, World economic revitalization and Universal ethical standards.

The Council selects specific issues and develops proposals for action from these areas and communicates these proposals directly to government leaders, other national decision-makers, heads of international organizations and influential individuals around the world.

More information about the InterAction Council can be found on the InterAction Council website.