£280,000 to protect Wales’ ancient monuments

Monday 22 June 2015

Precious ancient monuments and war memorials across Wales are being awarded a share of almost £287,000 of Welsh Government funding to restore and protect them for future generations.

Picture of Llandaff Cathedral

Llandaff Cathedral

Many of Wales’ ancient monuments are on privately owned land. These grants provide an incentive for landowners and occupiers to carry out repair work that may otherwise be left ignored, resulting in the loss of important parts of our heritage which help tell the story of our past.

The grants include almost £33,500 for Kendricks Cave in Conwy, one of the most important Palaeolithic cave sites in North West Europe. Rare artefacts recovered during excavations of the cave include a decorated horse jawbone, a find of international significance.

Recently the local town council have raised concerns about damage and anti-social behaviour around the site, and an inspection found the cave to be in an unpleasant state, filled with waste, including discarded needles.

The grant will fund the clearance and cleaning of the cave and secure it from further damage by installing security grilles, with lockable doors. It will also fund the creation of a 3D digital model of the cave to be displayed at Llandudno Museum and the Great Orme Visitor Centre to improve public understanding of the cave and its prehistoric origins.

Announcing the funds, the Deputy Minister for Culture, Sport and Tourism, Ken Skates, said: “All over Wales our landscape is scattered with ancient monuments which shape our communities and tell the story of our past. Without the right protection and management these precious monuments could be lost forever.

“I recently introduced the Historic Environment (Wales) Bill which will legislate to better care and protect our important historic buildings and monuments. I am pleased that through these grants we are already supporting conservation projects across Wales which will lead the way in protecting our past for the Wales of tomorrow.”

Other projects awarded grants include maintaining the public access to Owain Glyndwr’s mount, work to support structural repairs to Llandaff Cathedral and work to preserve Neath War Memorial Clock and Bells.

Many of Wales’ ancient monuments are on privately owned land. These grants provide an incentive for landowners and occupiers to carry out repair work that may otherwise be left ignored, resulting in the loss of important parts of our heritage which help tell the story of our past.

The grants include almost £33,500 for Kendricks Cave in Conwy, one of the most important Palaeolithic cave sites in North West Europe. Rare artefacts recovered during excavations of the cave include a decorated horse jawbone, a find of international significance.

Recently the local town council have raised concerns about damage and anti-social behaviour around the site, and an inspection found the cave to be in an unpleasant state, filled with waste, including discarded needles.

The grant will fund the clearance and cleaning of the cave and secure it from further damage by installing security grilles, with lockable doors. It will also fund the creation of a 3D digital model of the cave to be displayed at Llandudno Museum and the Great Orme Visitor Centre to improve public understanding of the cave and its prehistoric origins.

Announcing the funds, the Deputy Minister for Culture, Sport and Tourism, Ken Skates, said: “All over Wales our landscape is scattered with ancient monuments which shape our communities and tell the story of our past. Without the right protection and management these precious monuments could be lost forever.

“I recently introduced the Historic Environment (Wales) Bill which will legislate to better care and protect our important historic buildings and monuments. I am pleased that through these grants we are already supporting conservation projects across Wales which will lead the way in protecting our past for the Wales of tomorrow.”

Other projects awarded grants include maintaining the public access to Owain Glyndwr’s mount, work to support structural repairs to Llandaff Cathedral and work to preserve Neath War Memorial Clock and Bells. More information can be found on the Anicent Monuments Grants page.