Grants for War Memorials

  • War memorial at Aberystwyth

    War memorials were often sited in prominent positions. Designed by Mario Rutelli of Rome, the town war memorial at Aberystwyth is set within the precinct of the medieval castle. The winged statue of Victory seems to reach out towards the sea.

  • War memorial in Llandaff

    War memorial imagery is often striking. At Llandaff, a woman dressed in Celtic costume personifies the place itself. The flanking figures of young men pay respect to the sons of Llandaff, including former pupils of the Cathedral School.

  • Decorative gates at Pontypool

    War memorials can take many forms. These decorative gates at Pontypool commemorate the fallen of the First World War (1914–18).

  • A soldier with rifle and bayonet pointing downwards on the war memorial at Rhyl. This common pose denotes a time for prayer and reflection.

    A soldier with rifle and bayonet pointing downwards on the war memorial at Rhyl. This common pose denotes a time for prayer and reflection.

  • Abergavenny War Memorial

    At Abergavenny, this weary looking soldier reflects the exhaustion of war. The war memorial was erected to commemorate the First World War (1914–18) over the course of which 35,000 Welsh men were killed.

  • Flint War Memorial

    The design of many war memorials was inspired by classical tradition. At Flint, the obelisk commemorates the South African War (1899–1902); the cenotaph commemorates the First World War (1914–18) and later conflicts.

  • Detail from a memorial to slate workers at Capel Baladeulyn, Nantlle.

    Some war memorials commemorate individual communities. This detail is from a memorial to slate workers at Capel Baladeulyn, Nantlle.

  • The Welsh National Memorial in Alexandra Gardens, Cardiff.

    The Welsh National Memorial in Alexandra Gardens, Cardiff, is a very public focal point for the annual act of remembrance, which commemorates the lives of all Welsh men and women who have given their lives in service of their country.

  • Monument to the Royal Welch Fusiliers in Wrexham

    William Goscombe John — one of Wales’s finest sculptors — worked on many war memorials in Wales, including this monument to the Royal Welch Fusiliers in Wrexham.

  • At Rhayader, a Welsh dragon is shown defeating a German eagle.

    Patriotic messages often feature on war memorials in Wales. Here, at Rhayader, a Welsh dragon is shown defeating a German eagle.

  • War memorial in Borth

    War memorials were often paid for by public subscription. The cliff-top site of the Borth memorial made it vulnerable to a lightning strike in 1983 after which it was re-erected through public subscription for a second time.

  • War memorial in Blackwood

    The design of the war memorial at Blackwood — like several in Wales — was inspired by the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London. The steps and railings help to create an imposing and protective space in which to honour the fallen.

  • Carmarthen’s Crimean War memorial

    Often, several different craft skills are in evidence in war memorials. These carefully detailed cast-iron crossed muskets with bayonets surround Carmarthen’s Crimean War (1853–56) memorial.

  • Figure of a triumphant soldier at Ebbw Vale

    This figure of a triumphant soldier at Ebbw Vale reflects a different attitude to war. The memorial is made of a number of different materials — stone, bronze and cast-iron — each of which needs its own special conservation techniques.

  • This memorial to the South African War (1899–1902) is in a prominent site on Twthill above Caernarfon.

    The Celtic cross was often used in war memorials and recalls both our Christian and Welsh heritage. This memorial to the South African War (1899–1902) is in a prominent site on Twthill above Caernarfon.

War memorials are a familiar sight throughout Wales. Each tells the stories of lives lost and the families and communities devastated by the effects of war. They continue to be focal points for commemoration and their care and conservation is vital to ensure that we continue to honour the memory of those who gave their lives in service for their country.

Cadw’s grant scheme is designed to help with projects for the repair and conservation of war memorials in Wales.

Developed in partnership with the War Memorials Trust, the scheme will help to safeguard memorials for future generations, with grants of up to 70% of the eligible costs (up to a maximum of £10,000) available for conservation and repair.

To make an application you will need:  

  • guidance notes
  • an application form
  • Caring for War Memorials in Wales
  • Caring for War Memorials in Wales — Technical Guidance.

PDF versions of these documents can be found below. Please contact Cadw if you need paper copies of any of these documents.

Caring for War Memorials in Wales

Caring for War Memorials in Wales explains the special interest of war memorials in Wales and suggests how custodians, local authorities, community and town councils, and local people can draw up conservation maintenance plans to make sure that this unique legacy is looked after for future generations.

However, there is a delicate balance to be struck between maintaining a memorial and any work that could cause damage or accelerate its decay. For more detailed technical maintenance guidance, please consult our companion publication Caring for War Memorials — Technical Guidance.

The scheme forms part of Cymru’n Cofio – Wales Remembers 1914-1918, the centenary programme of commemoration of the First World War led by the Welsh Government.

War Memorials Trust

Grants may be available for war memorials from the War Memorials Trust. The trust can also advise on appropriate conservation methods. 

You can find further details on the War Memorials Trust website or telephone 020 7233 7356.

Memorials Grant Scheme

Additional help may be available through this scheme run by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport in Wales and England, which refunds VAT incurred in the construction, repair and maintenance of memorials. 

You can find further details on the memorials grant scheme website or telephone 0845 600 6430.

Heritage Lottery Fund

The Heritage Lottery Fund can provide funding to help groups, communities and organisations mark the centenary of the First World War, including memorials, buildings and sites.

UK War Memorials website

UK War Memorials has been developed to provide easy access to what specialist organisations know about war memorials and tap into expert advice on how best to look after them. This includes how to get grants for conservation and how to get memorials listed.

It will expand in stages over the next four years so that by the end of the project ukwarmemorials.org will be easily searchable, helping people track down historical information, listed status, condition and inscribed names.

Powys War Memorials Project

The project commemorates the centenary of World War 1 and has many elements including supporting local communities to apply for project funding for a rolling programme of repairs and restoration to war memorials and their immediate surroundings. www.powyswarmemorials.co.uk