Welsh History Month

  • The main building of Bangor University, listed Grade I.

    The main building of Bangor University, listed Grade I.

  • A bird’s-eye view of Kidwelly Castle, Carmarthenshire, filmed using the latest drone video technology as part of Cadw’s ‘Castles from the Clouds’ project.

    A bird’s-eye view of Kidwelly Castle, Carmarthenshire, filmed using the latest drone video technology as part of Cadw’s ‘Castles from the Clouds’ project.

  • A submerged forest exposed at low tide at Borth beach, Ceredigion (© Nigel Nayling).

    A submerged forest exposed at low tide at Borth beach, Ceredigion (© Nigel Nayling).

  • A computer-generated image of Segontium Roman Fort gives an idea of the scale of the fort and shows how it would look in Caernarfon today.

    A computer-generated image of Segontium Roman Fort gives an idea of the scale of the fort and shows how it would look in Caernarfon today.

  • The new interpretive gates at Caerphilly Castle, designed by Rubin Eynon with local blacksmith Glen Adams

    The new interpretive gates at Caerphilly Castle

  • Criccieth Castle, Gwynedd, is situated on the Wales Coast Path in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and attracts visitors from all over the world.

    Criccieth Castle, Gwynedd, is situated on the Wales Coast Path in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and attracts visitors from all over the world.

  • An aerial view of Dolforwyn Castle, Powys, built by the last native prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, in 1273. © Visit Wales (Crown Copyright).

    An aerial view of Dolforwyn Castle, Powys, built by the last native prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, in 1273. © Visit Wales (Crown Copyright).

  • One of many stone sculptures at St Winefride’s Well, Flintshire; this carving depicts a man carrying a pilgrim unable to walk to the well. © Mick Sharp Photography.

    One of many stone sculptures at St Winefride’s Well, Flintshire; this carving depicts a man carrying a pilgrim unable to walk to the well. © Mick Sharp Photography.

  • The long-lost wall painting of ‘St. George and the Dragon’, uncovered at St. Cadoc’s Church in the Vale of Glamorgan (© Jane Rutherfoord)

    The long-lost wall painting of ‘St. George and the Dragon’, uncovered at St. Cadoc’s Church in the Vale of Glamorgan (© Jane Rutherfoord)

  • Tŷ-mawr Wybrnant, Conwy, the home of Bishop William Morgan, dated to 1564/65 using the latest scientific techniques. © Crown copyright: RCAHMW

    Tŷ-mawr Wybrnant, Conwy, the home of Bishop William Morgan, dated to 1564/65 using the latest scientific techniques. © Crown copyright: RCAHMW

  • An aerial view of Parys Mountain, Anglesey, showing the remains of what was once the world's largest copper mine. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW

    An aerial view of Parys Mountain, Anglesey, showing the remains of what was once the world's largest copper mine. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW

  • A view along the Slate Quay of Caernarfon Waterfront, with the castle dominating the mouth of the river Seiont, prior to the commencement of regeneration activity in the area. © Visit Wales (Crown Copyright)

    A view along the Slate Quay of Caernarfon Waterfront, with the castle dominating the mouth of the river Seiont, prior to the commencement of regeneration activity in the area. © Visit Wales (Crown Copyright)

  • Funding from the Big Lottery and a conservation grant from Cadw gave Capel Carmel in Pennal, Gwynedd, a new lease of life. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW

    Funding from the Big Lottery and a conservation grant from Cadw gave Capel Carmel in Pennal, Gwynedd, a new lease of life. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW

  • Penrhyn Slate Quarry by Henry Hawkins, 1832. The painting hangs in Penrhyn Castle, which is cared for by the National Trust and open to the public. © National Trust

    Penrhyn Slate Quarry by Henry Hawkins, 1832. The painting hangs in Penrhyn Castle, which is cared for by the National Trust and open to the public. © National Trust

  • The Royal Charter under sail in 1856, three years before it was wrecked off the coast of Anglesey (WSH-3-49, Courtesy of the Anglesey Archives).

    The Royal Charter under sail in 1856, three years before it was wrecked off the coast of Anglesey (WSH-3-49, Courtesy of the Anglesey Archives).

  • Workmen heaving a giant oak beam, imported by sea from America, into Caernarfon Castle in 1912. The beam was used to support new timber floors, which can still be seen in the castle today.

    Workmen heaving a giant oak beam, imported by sea from America, into Caernarfon Castle in 1912. The beam was used to support new timber floors, which can still be seen in the castle today.

  • The north front of Dyffryn House and Gardens, Vale of Glamorgan. © National Trust Images/Andrew Butler

    The north front of Dyffryn House and Gardens, Vale of Glamorgan. © National Trust Images/Andrew Butler

  • ‘Looking over Dylan’s shoulder’ — artwork produced by Ysgol Talacharn, Laugharne, as part of Cadw’s education project.

    ‘Looking over Dylan’s shoulder’ — artwork produced by Ysgol Talacharn, Laugharne, as part of Cadw’s education project.

  • The sculpture of a war weary soldier from the war memorial at Abergavenny. © Crown Copyright: The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales

    The sculpture of a war weary soldier from the war memorial at Abergavenny. © Crown Copyright: The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales

  • Cambrian Colliery, Clydach Vale, from the south-east in 1960. © National Museum Wales

    Cambrian Colliery, Clydach Vale, from the south-east in 1960. © National Museum Wales

Each year, experts from Cadw and partners including museums, archaeological trusts and the Heritage Lottery Fund team up to bring stories from Wales’s rich and diverse heritage to life as part of Welsh History Month – a month-long series of articles and never-before-seen images in the Western Mail and on WalesOnline.

Kicking off on the 3rd October, the theme of 2015’s Welsh History Month is 'What have the Welsh ever done for us?’

Deputy Minister for Culture, Sport and Tourism, Ken Skates, said: 'Wales’ vibrant history is made up of communities and individuals who have influenced all areas of life, from industry and politics to literature and the arts. They have inspired generations and left a lasting impression on the world.

‘This is why learning about our past is so important. It is the story of our country and its people, and how, through individual acts, works and discoveries, Wales was shaped into the modern, thriving country it is today.’

Here you’ll find links to the full library of Cadw 2015 Welsh History Month essays as they appear each day on WalesOnline. For essays written by our partners, please visit the WalesOnline website.

Please note, the articles are available in English only.


What have the Welsh ever done for us? An awful lot...
Wales has had a huge impact on the world, says Ken Skates, Deputy Minister for Culture, Sport and Tourism

TE Lawrence, the Welsh-born 'greatest Englishman who ever lived’
Erin Lloyd Jones, from Cadw, reflects on the early life of TE Lawrence, best known as ‘Lawrence of Arabia’

Gerald of Wales championed what he believed were the ancient rights of his church
Bill Zajac, from Cadw, looks back at Gerald’s fight for St Davids, which would take him to Rome three times and dominate his life for the next four years

Edward George 'Taffy' Bowen
Jon Berry, from Cadw, describes the remarkable technical achievements of one of Wales' most influential wartime scientists and highlights his scientific advances

Sir Clough Williams-Ellis - the legacy of 'the architect' of Portmeirion
Judith Alfrey, from Cadw, looks back on Sir Clough's legacy and shows how he has inspired others to think differently about the build environment

Harri Tudur - the Pembroke boy who went on to be king
A look back at the early life of the great monarch Henry VII – to the young boy, Harri Tudur, who was born and bred in Wales

Hugh Owen Thomas
Polly Groom, from Cadw, pays tribute to Welsh orthopaedic surgeon Hugh Owen Thomas (1834-91) and his invention of the Thomas splint – a device that went on to saves thousands of lives during and after World War I