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Overview

More than the sum of its parts

Montgomery is one of those castles that, even in ruin, retain a powerful atmosphere and presence that transcend its state of preservation. Perhaps it’s something to do with its location, on a steep crag above a pretty Georgian town with all-seeing views across the Welsh border. Commenced around 1223 on the orders of Henry III in response to the growing power of Welsh native prince Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (Llywelyn the Great), Montgomery’s stone castle replaced a nearby wooden fort known as Hen Domen. Perched on its rocky ridge, this new fortress was significantly sturdier and more sophisticated, with a stone inner ward, well, deep defensive ditches crossed by drawbridges and walled town.

The castle remained in use for centuries, surviving attacks by Llywelyn in 1228 and 1231 and Llywelyn’s son Dafydd in 1245. The castle’s ultimate end came during the Civil War, when it fell to the Parliamentarians and was demolished in 1649, leaving just the crumbling towers and low walls that stand today.


Opening times

Daily 10am - 6pm

Last admission 30 minutes before closing

Daily 10am - 4pm

Last admission 30 minutes before closing

Closed 24, 25, 26 December and 1 January


Prices

Category Price
Admission
Free

Facilities

Bikes access icon Car park icon No drones icon No smoking icon

Bike storage area available in car park or close to site.

There is parking for approx .15 cars on site with one dedicated disabled parking space (approx. 100 metres).

Cadw do not allow drone flying from or over its guardianship sites, except by contractors commissioned for a specific purpose, who satisfy stringent CAA criteria, have the correct insurances and are operating under controlled conditions.

Smoking is not permitted.


Directions

Rail
Welshpool 8m (12.9km) On hill above Montgomery town centre

Postcode SY15 6HN